Retired Elite Soldier Took Matters Into His Own Hands to Protect Endangered Animals in Africa

His name is Damien Mander. He served as a special forces sniper and clearance diver for Australia. After 3 years on the frontline of Iraq war, he left the military in 2008.

While still considering his options, Damien took a trip to Africa and was horrified to learn that the rhinos and elephants are being hunted to extinction by poachers. Saddened by this scourge sweeping Africa’s wildlife, he returned to Australia, sold his house and used his life savings to found the International Anti-Poaching Foundation.

Rivaling the price of gold on the black market, rhino horn is at the center of a bloody poaching battle,” according to National Geographic.

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National Geographic

After seeing the horrors that the Africa’s wildlife is dealing with, Special Ops sniper Damien Mander became an anti-poaching crusader.

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He’s convinced that his specialized military skills and experience can help save the rhinos and other endangered animals from poachers.

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But he knows that he’s fighting against well-organized criminal poaching networks that have been operating in Africa for decades.

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These modern-day poachers utilize military equipment and tactics to kill high-target species like rhinos, elephants, and gorillas.

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Undertrained and poorly equipped rangers are killed in the cross-fire.

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Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images

The IAPF led by Damien set out in 2009 to change all that.

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National Geographic

He sought to level the battle field by developing a force of highly trained, well-armed anti-poaching rangers who operate with sophisticated military tactics..

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Brent Stirton Photography
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He utilizes everything in his arsenal and whatever help and assistance he gets from generous people who support his organization’s efforts.

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Damien and the members of the International Anti-Poaching Foundation are trying to save what few rhinos are left in Africa.

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Brent Stirton Photography

In Zimbabwe, since the security operations of the IAPF in 2010, not one rhino has been poached.

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100kms to the east, however, the rhino population has been decimated.

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From 76 black rhinos, they’re now down to a remaining few in recent years.

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If there’s someone who’s going to save the rhinos and some other endangered animals in Africa, this is the guy.

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Discovery Channel

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Receiving donations of much needed equipment, medicine and other stuff from generous people.

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(Source: Imgur, National Geographic)

To donate and help support the International Anti-Poaching Foundation (IAPF) in their fight to save Africa’s wildlife, go to this link.

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